Martin Gleeson's Children's Stories From Ireland - Children's Stories Net


 
 
Children's Stories Net
 
Free  Children's  Stories  by  Leading  Authors
 
  Home     Parents and Teachers     Submit your own Story     Contact Us   Share this Children's Stories Page on Face Book Share this Children's Stories Page on Twitter

 
Children's Stories Fropm Ireland
FREE
Children's Stories

 
  Stories  
 
 Free Story Access 
 
 Children's Stories BLOG 
 
 This Weeks Featured Story 
 
 Sheila Helliwell's Stories 
 
 Elliot's Amazing Adventures 
 
 Robert Parfett's Stories 
 
 Artie Knapp's Stories 
 
Terry Fitterer's Stories
 
 Paul Ray's Stories 
 
 Dennyk's Stories 
 
 Stories From Ireland 
 
 New Children's Stories  
 
 Children's Stories 
 
 Poems & Rhyming Stories 
 
 Longer Children's Stories 
 
 Children's Authors 
 
 Author Sheila Helliwell 
 
 Author Linda Farrelly 
 
 Author Joanne Hayle 
 
 Young Writer Awards 
 
 Children's Story Illustrators 
 

 

 
 
Children's Stories Library
 
 Children's Stories Library 
 
 

 
 
The Not So Wise Owl - Children's Rhyming Story Book
 
 The Not So Wise Owl 
 
 

 
 
Elliot's Amazing Adventures Children's Book
 
 Amazing Adventures Book 
 
 

 
 
Sponsor Children's Stories
 
 Sponsor Children's Stories 
 
 
 
 
 
Barry And The Wicked Dogs
 
Reader Star Rating: Children's Story Star Rating
 

 
 
Childrens-Stories.net Terms of use: you may view online and freely print a single paper copy of the entire story page for your own personal domestic private use, individual qualified Teachers may also freely print additional paper copies for teaching purposes within their own educational establishment. Any other use is strictly prohibited without prior written consent by letter from us, please see the contact us button above.

 

Early one morning Barry, Pat the Wind and Pat the Arms were in the kitchen of their house getting the breakfast.
Pat the Arms had cooked a big bowl of porridge and put it into four bowls.
Pat the Wind was cooling it by blowing gently at it, because it was too hot.
 
Pat the Eyes had been out watching a bird building a nest in a tree many miles away.
He saw a little girl walking wearily towards the house and he went in to tell the others.
 
"Bring her in here." said Barry.
When the girl came into the kitchen, Barry and his three friends could see that she was very tired and worried.
 
"What is wrong, little girl?" asked Barry, and the girl told them the story of what had happened in her village a few days previously.
 
"My father is the inn-keeper in the village of Greytown," she said.
"My mammy looks after my little brother Davey and I sweep the floor every day.
Last week three bad men came to the village.
Each of them had a wicked dog.
When the men tell them, the dogs bite everyone."
 
"That is awful," said Barry, "and what happened?"
"The men and the dogs frightened us all," said the little girl.
"The men are the Boldie Brothers.
One of them has a black dog and he went into the bakery.
The dog bit the baker in the hand and the man stayed in the bakery all day eating cream cakes without paying."
 
"Another of the Boldie Brothers, the one with the brown dog, went into the grocer's shop.
The dog bit the grocer in the arm and the man stayed in the shop all day eating sweets without paying."
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
"The third man, the one with the white dog came into my Daddy's Inn.
The dog bit my Daddy in the leg and the man stayed in the inn all day drinking beer without paying.
My Mammy had to stay upstairs with Davey in case the dog bites him, too.
Davey is only three months old."
 
"Don't worry, little girl," said Barry.
"My friends and I will help you.
We will eat our breakfast first, then we will get some ropes and some bits of meat and go to your village."
"Please do," said the little girl. "My name is Molly."
 
A few minutes later, Pat the Eyes found some rope in one of the farm sheds.
He got some meat from the kitchen and they set out on the journey to Greytown.
Molly was too tired to walk, so Pat the Arms lifted her up and carried her along the road in his big arms.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
On the way to the village Pat the Eyes said, "I see a notice on a wall in the Big Town on the other side of the valley.
It says that the Sheriff there is offering a reward of one hundred gold pieces to whoever captures the Boldie Brothers."
"That sounds good" said Barry. "I think the villagers could do with some extra money."
 
When Barry, the three Pats and the little girl Molly arrived in Greytown, there was no-one on the main street as all the villagers were very frightened.
Barry noticed that the houses had not been painted for a long time and looked very shoddy.
 
When he saw the big black dog outside the bakery, Barry threw a piece of meat towards it.
The dog ran for the meat, and Pat the Arms grabbed it and tied its mouth with rope. Now the dog could neither bite nor bark.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
Barry then opened the door of the bakery.
The first Boldie Brother took up a big stick and ran towards him.
Pat the Wind took in a big breath of air and then blew the bad man towards the wall so hard that he fell down roaring.
Then Pat the Arms tied him up with rope.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
Barry and his friends then went to the grocer's shop.
They saw the big brown dog outside the door.
Again Barry threw some meat towards it.
When the dog ran for meat, Pat the Arms grabbed it and tied its mouth with rope.
Now the second dog could neither bite nor bark.
Barry then opened the door of the grocer's shop.
The second Boldie Brother grabbed a chair and ran at Barry with it.
Pat the Wind took in a big breath of air and blew the man towards the wall so hard that he fell down roaring.
Then Pat the Arms tied him up with rope.
 
Barry and his friends then went to the village inn.
They saw the big white dog outside the door.
Again Barry threw some meat towards it.
When the dog ran for the meat, Pat the Arms grabbed it and tied its mouth with rope.
Now the third dog could neither bite nor bark.
 
Barry then opened the door of the inn.
The third Boldie Brother and Molly's Daddy were inside.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
The Boldie Brother had a big knife in his hand!
"If you come near me I will kill this man," he shouted.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
Pat the Arms then took up a big wine bottle and threw it.
The bottle knocked the knife from the bad man's hand.
 
The bad man then ran upstairs to where Molly's Mammy and baby brother were staying.
He shouted down, "If you come up here I will throw the baby out the window!"
 
Barry told Pat the Arms to go out on the street and to stay under the window where Molly's Mammy was holding baby Davey.
He told Pat the Wind to follow him upstairs.
 
When Barry and Pat the Wind went into the upstairs room, they saw that the third Boldie Brother had taken the baby from his Mammy.
"Run away or the baby goes out the window," he growled.
"We do not run away from anyone," replied Barry.
"Hand over that baby now or you'll be sorry."
 
Then the third Boldie Brother threw the little baby out of the window!
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
Molly's Mammy was shocked, but Barry said, "Don't worry about Davey. Pat the Arms will have caught him easily in his big arms."
Pat the Wind then took in a breath of air and blew the bad man towards the wall so hard that he fell down roaring.
Pat the Wind then tied him up with rope.
When they went downstairs out to the street Pat the Arms was gently holding the baby and saying funny things to him!
 
Molly's Mammy and Daddy and Molly were delighted that they were no longer in danger and that Davey was saved.
The bad men were tied up and the dogs were now on leads.
The people from the village came out of their houses thanking Barry and his three friends over and over again.
Barry saw that many of them looked quite poor.
Barry told the village people that he and the Three Pats had business to do in the Big Town and that they would be back before dark.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
Pat the Arms found a big sack and stuffed the Boldie Brothers into it!
He heaved it over his back with ease and carried it along the road like it was a sack of coal!
Pat the Wind brought the three dogs along with him on their leads made of rope.
 
When they reached the Big Town, they went to the Sheriff's office.
When the Sheriff he saw that they had the Boldie Brothers in the big sack he was delighted.
"These three devils have been causing trouble for years but no-one could catch them. I'm glad to hand you the reward of a hundred pieces of gold."
Barry took the bag of money and left the Sheriff's Office.
 
"Do you see a dog trainer anywhere?" Barry asked Pat the Eyes.
"Yes, I see a little sign up that street," he said, and they went that way.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
Barry showed the three dogs to the dog trainer.
"Could you train those three dogs to be nice animals," he asked.
"I can train the most savage dog to be a lovely pet in a few weeks. There is no such thing as a wicked dog, only wicked owners."
Barry gave the dog trainer a gold coin, and asked him to find three good homes for the dogs when they were trained.
The dog trainer was very happy with that.
 
Barry and the Three Pats then went into a hardware shop.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
He bought sandpaper, paint brushes and lots of cans of paint of many colours. He paid with some of the gold coins and had the cans put into a large heavy bag. Pat the Arms was able to carry it with ease.
When Barry and his three friends arrived back at the village, the people were waiting for them.
"We want to have a feast in your honour." they said.
"That will do tomorrow," said Barry, "but first we will have something small to eat before resting for the night.
The houses in this village need cleaning and painting and we have the paint."
"We'll start in the morning." the village people said.
 
Barry and the Three Pats had a small meal, and then went to bed in the inn.
They slept soundly after a very busy day.
 
The next day Barry and the Three Pats got up and had their breakfast.
Barry wanted to pay the inn-keeper, but he would take no money.
When they went out on the street they were amazed to find that all the village people were working, cleaning, sanding and painting their houses.
 
As they walked around the village watching the painting being done, Pat the Wind blew at any house with wet paint and it dried immediately! After a few hours the village looked beautiful and full with colour.
 
Barry and the Three Pats were then invited into the inn for a big feast.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
They were served roast pig, potatoes and fresh vegetables.
This was washed down with sparkling lemonade.
The village people thanked them over and over again.
"We have changed the name of our village," they told Barry.
"From today on, it will be called Rainbowtown!"
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
When the feast was over, Barry gave the bag of gold coins to the inn-keeper.
He wanted Barry to keep it, but Barry said, "The Three Pats and I have lots of money. Give this to anyone in the village who needs it!"
 
Barry then gave Molly a big hug and shook hands with her Mammy and Daddy.
He gave baby Davie a kiss.
All the villagers said thanks and goodbye as Barry and the Three Pats waved to them all on their journey home.
 
Children's Story: Barry And The Wicked Dogs by Martin Gleeson
 
 
If you enjoyed this story, Martin has created many more (see further down), to register for more Free Stories please click below or click the Free Story Access button top left on this page.
 
  Click Here    to Register for more Free Stories.
 
 
Story Rating   Five Star Children's Story Rating System
 
If you've already registered please rate this story below from your own point of view. Click one of the radio buttons next to a star below and then enter your registered email address. You can only rate each story once.
Children's Story Rating System: GREY - Not Yet Rated Not Yet Rated
Children's Story Rating System: BLUE - You consider the story is OK You consider the story is OK
Children's Story Rating System: RED - You think the story is Good You think the story is Good
Children's Story Rating System: GREEN - You would Recommend the story You would Recommend the story
Children's Story Rating System: GOLD - The story is Outstanding The story is Outstanding
 
Children's Story Rating System - User Email      Enter your Registered Email eg: name@mail.com
 
  click button to rate story
Story star ratings shown (2 to 5 stars) are the average of all rating scores to date, these may not update immediately subject to browser and local cache settings, in some cases it may take a few hours.
 
About Martin
 
Martin is now a retired College Lecturer who enjoys writing and foreign travel with his wife, he occasionally writes for magazines.
 
While Martin's five children were growing up, he and his wife Carmel loved to tell the children stories.
 
Two of these special stories were Smut Fada (means long snout) and The Three Pats.
 
When Martin's grandchild Katie wanted to hear some stories, Martin sat down to write the spin-off stories.
 
Credit is due to Martin's eldest son Rory who provides story illustrations (Smut Fada).
 
Martin's youngest son Barry, was the original inspiration for boy called Barry in The Three Pats story, Barry now gives Martin technical help with his computer.
 
Martin's Stories
 
Here's a list of just some of Martin's stories which are rotated on this page one at a time and available to registered readers. The entire collection is available immediately to those registered for Unlimited Children's Stories (see Free Story Access above).
 
Major Feathers And Silver
Smut Fada Book 1 Tales From Ireland
Smut Fada finds a home
Madam Elly learns a lesson
Major Feathers and Silver
Norah and Snowy
Owen Catches a Thief
The Three Pats
Barry and the Pirates
Barry and the Wicked Dogs
Barry helps a Farmer
Barry helps a sick girl
Barry saves the village girls

 
 
Thanks for your interest and happy reading.
 

 
 

 

 © designed, created, hosted and managed by   WWW Support Services    (click for info)